EXTENDED PROJECT PORTFOLIO

 

This is the new version – latest and last version – of the Extended Project Portfolio (FMP).  Please start to look through and begin adding the text that it asks for. This should be all the work you have done so far – based on the weekly PowerPoint’s I have delivered

Extended Project portfolio YEAR ONE FINAL 26.04.2017

This is Alma’s guide with some added guidance in blue speech bubbles:

Alma’s guide to FMP portfolio YEAR ONE FINAL 26.04.2017

 

Here is a PP that helps you understand what you are doing and why you are being asked dot do it.

Master 2 How to use your Project Portfolio

 

Pre-Production checklist

FMP pre production tracking document

 

An example of last years work that ticked all the boxes in the checklist.

FMP last year examples of pre production students work

 

PLEASE ALSO LOOK THROUGH MANY OF THE OTHER OLDER POSTS FOR HELP WITH YOUR WRITING.

Better journalism _ declutter _leads _ cliche4 questions to find a focus for your storyTips for Writing a Lead – first 25 words_Introductionsix-word-memoir-presentation43-activevspassivevoicesetting-questionsjournalism-presentation-1

FMP Year 1: Proposal and Research Week 3 (week beginning 18-4-2017)

Here are the PowerPoint’s for the Proposal and pre-production of the FMP. Please follow and make sure you are covering all aspects of the portfolio as you go, evidencing your research/findings and evaluating using the SWOT analysis. Remember a range of research and deciding what research is relevant to your ideas and aims for the project.

FMP week 2

FMP week 2b Research

FMP week 3

FMP week 4

 

This last PP details the pitch for the proposal.

FMP week 5

(the above PP for week 5 has been edited to suit a variety of forms and mediums.

Remember your research should impact and inform your work: many great works have relied on others that have gone before them so absorb, mimic and pay homage to others on your journey to finding your own style, voice, tone and intentions.

Zoran research

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 11: Preparing for progression in creative media production

Unit 11 – Preparing for progression in creative media production
                                                     Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria
AIM: Through a process of research, dialogue, reflection and evaluation,

to identify and prepare for specific higher education or employment

progression routes appropriate to their ambitions.

1.  Understand progression routes and related application processes.

1.1 Critically evaluate own strengths and ambitions to support own

development and meet identified goals.

1.2.Use knowledge and understanding of progression routes to make applications

within creative media production higher education or related employment.

2.  Understand communication, skills and knowledge for progression routes.

2.1. Critically evaluate a range of communication skills and knowledge required to

make application to progression routes within creative media production.

2.2.Use a range of communication skills and knowledge to support own progression goals.

3.  Be able to use promotion and presentation skills and knowledge to make applications

for future study or work.

3.1.Use knowledge and understanding of promotion and presentation skills to support

own development and meet identified goals.

 

Unit 12:Research and Critically examine the influence of historical and contemporary contexts on your practice

Unit aim: This unit will require students to research and critically examine the influence of historical and contemporary contexts on their own practice. The unit will enable the student to demonstrate a greater depth of understanding of their discipline and place within it.

It is expected that students should produce a piece of extended writing of a minimum of 1,500 words.

Other evidence is not prescribed. It could typically include reflective journals, blogs, workbooks, notebooks, research portfolios, storyboards, sampling, presentations in audio, visual and digital formats. This list is not exhaustive and students should be encouraged to develop the most appropriate evidence to demonstrate their achievement of the unit learning outcomes and assessment criteria.

Scheme of Work with added notes from Zoran:

sow-unit-12-ual-second-year

unit-12-sow-outline

Here are some other guides and tips to help:

structuring-your-writing

PowerPoint with structure and Learning Outcome Criteria:

structuring-your-writing

 

top-tips-for-researching-news-stories

doing-interview

research-project-recap-and-tips_techniques

qualitative-vs-quantitative-research

The Black Box system for organizing a story

Len Reed, environment and science team leader at The Oregonian, developed a system to help reporters handle unruly information.

The Black Box helps reporters sort through and prioritize the information they have and quickly and clearly make the case for their stories to editors. With the system, writing a story is essentially boiled into four phases.

the-black-box-system-for-organizing-a-story

Week 2 Sessions: Audio, Podcasts and Radio

Seeing with you ears.

Get your listener inside the world of your play (setting, Walk etc).

Whether writing a fictional piece or non-fiction remember all the crafting tools we have already covered: show and don’t tell, word choice, syntax, tone, characterisation, active language, specificity, The Hook and first 25 words – make sure you recap on all the sessions skills and edit, plus blog the development of the work: ideas, aims, process, decision making, editing, issues and solutions etc… Don’t forget also to continue researching industry examples to help with you own ideas especially in the early stages.

 

Here are the PowerPoints from the session and a further PP that may be of use now and in the future. Please refer to them in your BLOGS!

writing-for-radio

radio-pocasts-and-audio-books

documentray-writing-_-film-and-radio

 

Crook’s golden rule is that every word, every line, every scene must serve a dramatic purpose in terms of characterisation and plot development. Drop anything that does not have a dramatic purpose. This could equally apply to journalism/non-fiction as well as fiction.

Character: Your main character must have the sympathy of the audience. Your audience has to identify with your main character. If this does not happen you have created a failure. Booo!

Dialogue: This is how we engage dramatically with the world. Characters inform, argue, amuse, outrage, argue through the ebb and flow of dialogue. When we do we talk and that is how great radio plays are made…..by talking in dramatic dialogue.

The Plot: This is the story with lots of twists and turns. The more the merrier. Most listeners like good exciting plots. Without a good plot you’re eating a souffle that has gone flat. You need plot, more plot and more plot. Run at least two story lines. Two sub plots would be interesting. Keep the plots linked logically within the same play. The best system is a major and a minor storyline linked to one another. Get them to come together at the end.

The Beginning: The beginning is everything. If this part of it does not work you are trouble. Your listeners will desert you. You have failed. You do not exist as a dramatist. Booo!

The Moment of Arrival: This is how you drop your listeners into the story. Don’t give them a warm bed with comfortable pillows and a hot water bottle. The background and sub-text of previous histories is better explored through revelation in dramatic action. So parachute your listener into a top dramatic moment. Not the climax. That would be premature. Find the MOMENT to join the story. Avoid the slow snail’s explicatory route. Kick ’em into a high energy trip and whoosh them through the rapids.

Structure: Set up…struggle…resolution. You can reverse this if the set-up is more dramatic and explosive than the resolution. Regard your play as a series of phases

Polarities or Extremes: The art of story telling is exploring the extreme limits of our psychological or physical existence. To pitch one polarity against another.

Please follow the guidelines  in this document for the weekly blogs:

blog-post-criteria-sow

And check that you are adhering to the criteria for audio. Also evaluate and analyse how you are processing/developing your work with regards to the criteria.

Learning outcome:

The student will:

Assessment criteria:

The student can:

LO1: Be able to analyze an audio-based problem in creative media production 1.1 Analyze the requirements and parameters of an audio-based problem in creative media production.
1.2 Apply research activities to support solutions to an audio-based problem in creative media production.
LO2. Be able to use an integrated approach to audio –based creative media problem solving and production. 2.1 Demonstrate the ability to plan, organise and present solutions to an audio-based problem in creative media production.
2.2 Apply practical skills, understanding and methods to solve an audio-based problem in creative media production.
LO3: Be able to evaluate solutions to an

audio-based problem in creative media production.

3.1    Analyse the effectiveness of solutions to an audio-based problem in creative media production.

 

 

Unit 1 Portfolio Brief

Click here to see brief:

  • unit-1-portfolio-brief-three-pieces-of-work
  • Complete ALL reflective logs
  • Choose three pieces of writing that you would like to develop. You can choose from non-fiction, fiction or poetry. This may be a piece you have already begun or a new piece of writing.
  • At least one non-fiction and one fiction.
  • You can choose two non fiction and one fiction, or one non fiction and two non fiction
  • BUT
  • Each piece must be unique in some way i.e. different genre, different market audience, different magazine, different newspaper, different form, different theme.

AND

INCLUDE MUTIMEDIA PRODUCTION: RADIO, INTERACTIVE WEBPAGE. VERSION OF YOUR WORK E.G. SPOEKN WORD POEM, RADIO FEATURE OF REVIEW, ARTICLE, SCENE FROM FICTIONAL PIECES

For this you will collaborate with actors from the drama department

unit-1-brief – in Word with criteria breakdown for tagging.

Week 8 Reviews

THIS IS A CHANGE TO THE SCHEDULE – SCRIPTWRITING WAS TO BE COVERED THIS WEEK – TO HELP STUDENTS EVALUATE AND ANALYSE THEIR OWN WORK AS WELL AS INDUSTRY EXAMPLES. APPLY THE FOLLOWING TO ANY WORK YOU HAVE NOT EFFECTIVELY EVALUATED AND REFERRED TO THE RESEARCH PLUS INDUSTRY EXAMPLES (AS WELL AS ANY FURTHER RESEARCH).

¡Critically compare a range of communication methods used to convey meaning in creative media production.

¡Understand the characteristics and methods of communication within a media context

¡1.1 Critically compare a range of research tools, method and skills.

¡2.1 Critically compare a range of primary and secondary research sources.

¡Be able to use design and research tools, methods and skills to inform ideas for creative media production.

¡Understand critical perspectives that influence the analysis of creative media production activities

¡I.E. evaluate others work and use this to reflect back upon your work.

 

denote-connote-images

writing-reviews

To research and review the Grayson Perry Exhibition in the Beany. (see on-line for images and other reviews to compare and contrast with yours)

To write a review of two different mediums/forms from: For films, books, TV, theatre, art exhibitions, concert, music events, recorded music, restaurants, sports event or games…

Look at a range of other reviews and make a note of the language used.

How are the presented?

Are there any significant and distinctive characteristics within each of the reviews?

 

Grayson Perry:

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/dec/11/grayson-perry-my-pretty-little-art-career-review-a-suffocating-dose-of-little-England

 

https://www.turnercontemporary.org/exhibitions/grayson-perry

 

How to write a review:

http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Review

 

A critic

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/how-to-be-a-critic

 

Try Google: Being a critic

 

NOW USE THE ABOVE TO REFLECT AND EVALAUTE YOUR OWN WEEKLY WORK.

Unit 9 Brief

unit-9-brief

 

Unit 9 Brief: Words and Young communities

Exploring a theme and using different forms to tell the story.

Future Creative are an art organisation who have commissioned you as writers and journalist to explore the main issues effecting the 18 to 30 demographic to be part of an exhibition. They are especially interested in how words effect their audience.

This can include any theme from: identity, community, addiction, gender issues, cultural and social differences, tolerance, consumerism, obsession, fear, housing, education… you choose.

Once you have chosen a theme you must depict your story in two different forms:

Fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual media, script form (film, radio or stage), photography, spoken word or game narrative.

 

You, as the writer, can collaborate with other artist (film makers, directors, actors, poets, designers, graphic artists, musician, performing artists…) to produce the final piece.

 

The work will be part of an exhibition: Words and Young communities.